Episode 10 – Gateway Arch – Missouri State Quarter

Quarter Miles Travel | 0 comments

United States Mint Image

The Missouri state quarter has a design of Lewis and Clark traveling on the Missouri River and the Gateway Arch standing on the spot where the city of St. Louis began.  It is one of the most recognized monuments in the United States. It is described as majestic, stunning, spectacular, amazing, breathtaking, fascinating, a gleaming gem, an Architectural marvel. It can only be the Gateway Arch in St. Louis.

Standing on the banks of the Mississippi River, the striking stainless steel monument has many stories to tell.  From the start of a Native American city in AD700 called Cahokia, or the Mound City, to becoming one of the largest cities in the U.S. and a fur trading industry that inspired many to “go West, young man go West”, it has always held a proud place in American history.

From trade to food to music to industry, the city has been a melting pot for cultural expressions and the seat of historical events.

The stories on this podcast are from individuals who have first hand experiences to share and paint the picture of how the magnificent monument came to be built and how it continues to stands tall today and into the future as an iconic American landmark.

Annita host of Quarter Miles Travel – talks with:

Valerie Battle Kienzle – an author of What’s With St. Louis, the quirks, personality and charm of the gateway city and her recent publication – Ready to Wear. She who moved to St. Louis 20 years ago.

Jim Merkel – a St. Louis native who watched the building of the arch from the beginning to the end. He has written many books about the city – The Making of An Icon – The Dreamers, the Schemers, and the hard hats who built the Gateway Arch and Growing Up St. Louis

Carroll Allison – One of the welders who built the arch and helped place the last piece of the arch, connecting the south and north legs of the prestigious monument.

Ted “Lefty” Imbierowicz –After the final piece is in place, the structure which supported the building of the arch had to come down.  That’s where Lefty comes in to share his story.

Here are the stories of the Gateway Arch.

About the quarter

Release Date: August 4, 2003, this is the 24th coin released in the 50 State Quarters Program and the fourth released in 2003.

Date Missouri was admitted into the Union: August 10, 1821

Design: Corps of Discovery highlighting Lewis and Clark’s historic return to St. Louis down the Missouri River. The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Gateway Arch in the the background.

Artist: Alfred Maletsky

Websites for more info and to plan a trip to visit the National Park – Gateway Arch

www.usmint.gov

www.explorestlouis.com

www.nps.gov

Episode sponsored by Allianz Travel Insurance
Visit their website – www.allianzetravelinsurance.com

 

 

Photos from St. Louis, the Gateway Arch and National Park Service Museum

Gateway arch

The sun sets on the Gateway Arch

 

Gateway Arch

Artistic view of the arch. Taken standing beside the left leg facing the Mississippi River.

 

Gateway Arch

Photo – Sumi So

 

Gateway Arch

City view

 

Gateway Arch

The north and south legs are connected.

 

Gateway Arch

Photo – Sumi So

 

Gateway Arch

Friend of Quarter Miles Travel visits the Arch and takes the tram to the observation deck. Photo Sumi So

 

Gateway Arch

The tram car up/down for the observation deck. Photo – Sumi So

 

Gateway Arch

Waiting in line for the Observation Deck tram.

 

 

Gateway Arch

Visit the museum highlighting the history of St. Louis and the story of the Gateway Arch.  The photos below highlight some of the exhibits.

 

Gateway Arch

Music was a great influence to the St. Louis culture.

 

Gateway Arch

Ragtime music, a cultural influence to the city.

 

Gateway Arch

A view of the Mississippi River. Once the central form of transportation in the area. The railroad became the preferred of transportation, moving people and goods further into the interior of the state and away from the waterways. Photo – Sumi So

 

Gateway Arch

Trade between Europeans and Native Americans involved fur and skins. Photo – Sumi So

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