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Episode 13 – First Women of Virginia – Virginia State Quarter Part 2

*Reference to adult content 50:45 (time stamp)

First Women of Virginia

Virginia State Quarter Part 2

 

In part 1 of the Virginia State Quarter the three ships of the Virginia Company of London are featured on the reverse side of the quarter and their stories are shared. The voyage of the Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery ships, starts the path of development for the Virginia settlement with only men and boys onboard. Although there were only men and boys onboard, there are Indian women who are part of their story.  Through the years as more and more women and girls arrive,  their stories become part of the American fabric.

Part 2 of the Virginia State Quarter tells their stories.  Episode 13 of Quarter Miles Travel is important because we want to “say their names” and place their sacrifice, courage, struggles and accomplishments in their rightful place in history. This episode seeks to shine a light on how their lives were lived and the path they paved for us to travel today.

Who were the first women who left the England, and traveled across the Atlanta to settle in Virginia.  Who were the women who helped the men and boys arriving in 1607 to Jamestown. Who were the women captured from their homeland, brought across the Atlantic in ships, traded and enslaved.

 

Who were they you ask – 

They were strong, they were adventurous, brave and courageous most of all they were tenacious.  In part 2 of the Virginia quarter I asked my guest Katherine “Kate” Gruber to share several stories of Virginia women and their journey to overcome obstacles, oppressive laws, enslavement and make their impression on history.  

American women who helped build this nation.  We will tell their stories, we will say their name.

Katherine “Kate” Gruber is the historian and curator at Yorktown – Jamestown foundation and curated a very influential exhibit at the Jamestown settlement & American Revolution museum named Tenacity.  The perfect name to summarize the lives and stories of these women. 

Kate stated – “Our goal was simply to speak the names of the women who have been, for so long, written out of traditional narratives. To give them a voice, to tell their stories. To reinsert women— Virginia Indian, African, and English— into their rightful place in history.”

First women of Virginia – honoring their lives and contribution to what would become the United States of America.  

 

 

To learn more about Jamestown settlement visit the Jamestown Settlement and American Revolution Museum in Yorktown, Virginia.  

Visit their websitehistoryisfun.com

For more information on the U.S. Mint State and Commemorative quarters visit their websiteU.S. Mint . Gov

This episode of Quarter Miles Travel – The Viriginia Quarter Part 2 is sponsored by Allianz Travel Insurance.  The one stop for all of your travel insurance. Check out their website where you’ll find the perfect option to insure your trip to visit and learn more about the First Women of Virginia – allianztravelinsurance.com 

Click here for Episode 11 – Virginia State Quarter Part 1 

 

Resources –
Jamestown Settlement and American Revolution Museum
National Park Service
Library of Congress
Encyclopedia 

Photos –

 

First women of virginia
Pocahontas, Angelo and Anne Burras Laydon –  Their lives helped shape the story of Virginia. Photo – Jamestown – Yorktown Foundation

 

First women of virginia
The role of women in the settlement included duties such as making shirts. Photo – Jamestown – Yorktown Foundation

 

First women of Virginia
Women were responsible for planting and harvesting crops.  

 

First women of Virginia
Tobacco was grown, harvested, and dried. At various times during the development of the settlement.  Women both free, indentured and enslaved helped with the tobacco crops.

 

First women of virginia
Tobacco was the cash crop of the settlement with some planters becoming wealthy.

 

First women of virginia
Jamestown settlement living history museum. Example of early an settlement homestead.

 

First women of virginia
Food and crop storage was the responsibility of women. A reproduction at the Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum.

 

First women of virginia
The church was an integral part of the community. – Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum

 

First women of virginia
The settlement had various structures which served to provide things the community needed. – Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum

 

First women of Virginia
One of the structures at the Jamestown Settlement museum.  

 

first women of virginia
There were many laws, rules and regulations to life in Virginia and women faced strict and harsh punishment if they disobeyed the law. – Tenacity Exhibit

 

First women of virginia
Ducking chair use as punishment for gossiping part of the Tenacity Exhibit.                                                                  Photo – Jamestown – Yorktown Foundation

 

First women of virginia
Tenacity Exhibit – at the Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum in Yorktown featured 56 women whose names you may not know, but their lives and their place in history should be document, shared and revered.

 

First women of virginia
The Ferrar Papers document much of the lives and records of the settlement. Including the names and ages of women. – Tenacity Exhibit

 

First women of Virginia
The lives of Africans in Virginia can be interpreted through documents and records. Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum 

 

first women of virginia
Angelo was captured from her homeland of Angola and eventually brought to Virginia where she was traded and enslaved in Jamestown.  – Tenacity Exhibit

 

First women of virginia
Many enslaved Africans were taken from their homeland of Angola. – Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum 

 

 

This is a pile of Manillas which were used extensively as currency in West Africa as trade and exchange for slaves. This amount pictured would represent the cost of an enslave person.  – Jamestown Settlement – American Revolution Museum 

 

First women of Virginia
Elizabeth Key fought for her freedom and the freedom of her son. – Tenacity Exhibit.  

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